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BEAT STREET STUDIOS
by Todd Camplin

Studio spaces are the creative hub that allows artists to express and expand their art ideas.
Some have them connected to their homes or near their homes. I currently have mine at my
home. However, I once had a studio in downtown Waco with a bunch of other artists. I like
my home studio, but let's face it. Being around other artists while making your art can be
inspirational. You can feel the creative energy pulsing through the studio spaces.
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Beat Rice Studios is one of those creative engines moving forward with artists in full production
mode. I had visited the studio when they were creating an exhibit space and studio. After a
couple of shows, Beat Rice Studio shifted away from the exhibition and moved to focusing on
he art production. I ran an exhibition space for two years, I know how exhausting this endeavor
can be on someone. I am sure those at the studio probably felt some pressure from the
experience.
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Before the space was finished I met with Hilary Donnelly. She works in collage and nails. Her
work is earth in tone and color. Her Formation series uses simple informal geometric shapes with
disruption of the surface by nails. The nails are sometimes clustered together which organizes
the piece and other nails chaotically smashed into the surface to create an imbalance.

Another mode of production is Donnelly mix media paintings. She uses grids and reuse of
material in order to create thoughtful compositions of abstraction. I got the feeling she was
looking for a space that provided comradery and since she couldn’t find it she helped
build one herself.

Jill Nonnemacher is another artist under the roof of the studio. Her work look extruded then
solidified into abstract objects. Although, from her description, it appears she builds these
sculptures up from clay, plaster, burlap, string, wire, fabric and found material. The objects
are figurative in nature with parts that feel like heads or legs. Next is Deborah Welch. She
is a collage artist that celebrates color and the fun of the process of making.

I have seen shows by Erika Jaeggli and Keer Tanchak. Jaeggli was showing at WASS Gallery and
she had several large and small charcoal pieces. The title of the exhibition was FOMO or fear of
missing out. This is one show I am kicking myself I didn’t write about that month because this was
one I remember well. I had brought my daughter along and she and I were really taken by the
images. I remember lingering at her people and buildings. Normally you associate charcoal with
academic work, but this was far more soulful and I felt deeply moved my her images from this
show. Tanchak is a painter and was in a show at the Dallas Contemporary. I wrote about her,
Ambreen Butt, and Pia Cami.
Deborah Welch
So if you want to visit Hilary Donnelly, Jill Nonnemacher, Erika Jaeggli, Keer Tanchak, or Deborah
Welch you can visit the Beat Rice Studio website. Then look for the individual artists websites to
find their contact information. From each of the individual artists you can make an appointment
to visit. Remember, I believe Donnelly still holds to the vision in a place that artists of all levels and
backgrounds can meet and exchange ideas. So, look for further news on the Beat Rice Studios.
Blue Elephant
Boomerang 2017
collage on wood, framed 33x27"

Hilary Donnelly
Jill Nonnemacher
Erika Jaeggli