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The Artist Archetype
moderndallas.net interviews
Lloyd D. Lowe Jr., Artist
by Robert M. Diago
Archetype 2 (Wise Old Man)
That made me laugh. If I say he has a great sense of humor, I sound like an easy
audience. A penguin joke, really? It’s great because it’s silly and came out of the
blue, out of context. It also showed he was paying attention, I didn’t say “tell me
something random about yourself”. He put me at ease to go for a big
question…        

RMD: Your former drug addiction is front and center in ‘On The Rocks’.
May I ask about that?
LDL: Certainly.

RMD: One 12-stepper to another, what was your rock bottom?
LDL: There wasn’t one profound moment, but a series of realizations. One time
I hit a TA. My professor went out on a limb for me. He said he’d make sure I
didn’t get kicked out, said I was a hell of an artist, and told me to get my
shit together. I thought wow, someone believes in me. Then I thought wow,
I let him down. That’s a sobering moment.
I visited Rising Galley to check out ‘So...how are things?’ and found myself in a
smaller room - ‘On The Rocks’ - a show within the show. I sat in awe. I got up
occasionally for closer inspections. Mostly I sat. There in silence I got a text from
my friend and publisher of moderndallas.net, “Let’s talk. Next profile.
Who?”  - Light bulb flash!
RMD: Lloyd, why you’re an artist Lloyd?
LDL: Because I’m emotionally defunct. Seriously, art allows me to express fears,
anxieties and hopes in ways that I’m comfortable.

RMD: Tell me about your art.
LDL: I try to give my art a conscience. I hope that it will incite positive curiosity,
thought, and change.

RMD: So if you weren’t an artist…?
LDL: …I’d be crazy.
Archetype 16 (Orphan)
Archetype Instillation Shot
RMD: What artists have influenced you?
LDL: I can say all types of artistic media influence me: film, literature, photography,
painting, sculpture, theater. A few of my greatest influences have been my
grandmother, art teachers, Vivaldi, Bernini, Courbet, Picabia, Kurosawa, Joseph
Beuys, Bukowski, Hans-Georg Rauch… I take my influences from everything;
I never know when something is going to set off an idea.

RMD: What’s the best and worst part of being an artist?
LDL: Best is making the art.  The worst is the nervous punctuations of shows,
audiences, interviews, and generally dealing with the “authoritative voice.”
RMD: Got any hobbies?
LDL: Cooking and sleeping.

RMD: Tell me something else,
something random.
LDL: Okay, two penguins are
standing on an ice flow.  One
says to the other, “You look like
you’re wearing a tuxedo.”  
The other penguin replies,
“Who says I’m not?”
On The Rocks, Book Cover
RMD: Were you apprehensive
about putting this aspect of
your life out there?

LDL: In school there was something
racey, in your face about it. I don’t
want to say fun, but you know the
feeling. I showed it to galleries
looking for critique, and direction
not a show. Rising loved it and
said we had to do a show. Then
I was nervous.
RMD: What fresh approach do you bring to your work?
LDL: I don’t get locked into creating things that only fit a certain medium. I work
directly from point and intent.  The art is a byproduct of each desired idea, rather
than a set of images created for series.

RMD: That’s good advice for emerging artist, what else would you say?
LDL: Stick to your guns. Listen and look more than you speak. Never try to eat
anything bigger than your head.

RMD: What’s interesting about contemporary art today?
LDL: The cross-pollination of mediums that is happening now really excites me.  
An artist can create a piece, then photograph it, then work the photo into a
piece – it’s a great mix.

We take a trip down to Dragon Street and continue to talk shop. After a couple
of gallery stops we settled in at PDND Gallery. He had interned there and knew
the people, space and work well. He had a story or factoid about every
photograph, photographer, and technique. He’s clearly passionate about
photography and art.
RMD: What are you passionate
about?
LDL: Apparently, everything.  
People tell me I’m “intense.”  They
say it’s passion, and I’ll buy that,
I don’t do much I don’t believe
in. My girlfriend says my
greatest advantage and
greatest disadvantage in
interacting with people, is that
I’m incapable of being
anything but Lloyd.

RMD: How do you handle the
business side of art?
LDL: I used to say, “I’m an artist,
not a businessman.” That’s not
really feasible.  Working artist
need to be executives, press
agents, networkers, etc.

RMD: Any upcoming exhibitions
or projects that you are excited
about?
LDL: Graduate school.  I’m
actually fielding two really
nice offers right now.
Page 1 – It
RMD: You were looking for
cinematography program.
Did you find it?
LDL: Yes, I did, but I pursued still
photography school instead.
I felt like the program promoted
a more intimate relationship
between the artist and the
machine, which was always
my goal.

RMD: Tell me about English Kills.
LDL: Oh my, someone did their
homework!  English Kills is an
ongoing collaboration between
several musician friends and
me.  The music morphs as
people come in and out of
the project. It’s a great way
to convey my poetry.
RMD: You know the drill. Dinner, four people, one night…
LDL: I have two scenarios I’m quite found of. First my favorites: Composer Antonio
Vivaldi, artist Caravaggio, novelist Kurt Vonnegut, and soul singer Otis Redding. My
second fantasy evening would be Napoleon, Genghis Khan, Alexander the Great,
Rasputin, me…and the game RISK.
Page 16  – I don't sleep to dream
RMD: Lastly, what’s your favorite sandwich?
LDL: Bacon, lettuce, fried green tomato with blue cheese on whole-wheat
toast with raspberry vinaigrette.
Learn more about Lloyd D. Lowe Jr and his work at www.lloydlowejr.com or
contact Jamie Arendt at Rising Gallery
www.risinggallery.com  214.634.6262

All images care of the Rising Gallery, Copyright Lloyd D. Lowe, Jr.  2010.

Robert Mateo Diago is an artist, designer, writer and all-around creative type.
www.rmateodiago.com
Page 36 – Christ(ina)
Page 37 – Homewreckers
$urvival of the Fittest

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