Derivatives: Origins in Geometry
at Museum of Geometric and MADI Art through October 2
by Todd Camplin

When I first moved to Dallas, I noticed a strange building with colorful geometric
shapes jetting off the surface. I soon learned this was the Museum of Geometric
and MADI Art. Artist, Carmelo Arden Quin envisions an art that focuses on the
playful use of geometric shapes. Over fifty years later, this art movement is still
making an impact and especially right here in Dallas, because of the art collect.
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The MADI Museum also taps local talent to feature artists still working in the ideas of MADI.
Their current exhibition, Derivatives: Origins in Geometry juried show brought together
twenty-nine artists that work in the spirit of playful use of geometric shapes. The juror,
Vincent Falsetta, was perfect for the job, because of his own innovative use of
structurally vibrating shapes and lines.

Adela Andea received first place, which was no surprise to me.  I have seen Andea’s
work at Cris Worley Fine Art, here in Dallas and at the Anya Tish Gallery in Houston.
Each experience was like seeing a light show, with seemingly random elements
thrown at you visually.  Sometimes electric fans were added to give the piece a
little more movement. Andea is sometimes a kinetic, always tech, and a truly
21st century artist.
previous articles
Todd Camplin
Adela Andea - Crystalline Structure - 4 x 4 x 7’ - CCFL, Plexiglass, Computer Source, Clay 2011
Charlotte Smith - Side By Side - 12 x 12” Acrylic on Wood Panel 2011

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Orna Feinstein - Arboriform #2 - 29 x 25 x 10” -3D Monoprint on Plexiglass - 2011
Charlotte Smith received second place, another no brainer. Smith currently has a show