.
DALLAS ART FAIR ... MORE
by Todd Camplin

On Saturday, I took the day to visit the Fort Worth Modern to see the Glenn Legion
show, a quick revisit to Brand 10, a long visit to the Dallas Art Fair until it closed that
night, then over to Fountainhead show and the Reading Room near Fair Park. The
Dallas Art Fair had so much energy this year. I am glad I dedicated to spend several
hours to see all the booths. The twists and turns of the f.i.g. space make the Dallas
Art Fair unique. The space is informal and fun, and I was not surprised to meet a
group of patrons on a scavenger hunt.
.
© 2007-2012  moderndallas.net. - all rights reserved.
___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
_________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________
receive moderndallas.weekly
email:

The Dallas Art Fair had so many great highlights. One big surprise was visiting the Webb Gallery
booth. Located in Waxahachie, Texas, their collection of outside art made me reevaluate my
opinion. Listening to the conversations in the booth, I learned a great deal about some of the
complex stories and passions these artists possess. I was won over enough to make a trip to
an opening or two in the near future. Barry Whisler Gallery in Dallas had a collection of Texas
Modernist Toni LaSelle on the walls. Those 1950’s paintings looked like they could have been
painted today. LaSelle’s works speak directly to anyone still interested in painting. I love
the minimal shapes and over worked textured surfaces.
previous articles
by
Todd Camplin
_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

please support
our charities

Charlie James Gallery, in LA, had Alex Schaefer’s burning banks on display. Schaefer distilled
the sentiments of the 99% protest movement through his paintings. I think Schaefer’s work has
the right elements to fit into the art history narrative and the history of politics.

Over at the Fountainhead show were several little Dada like works and a gigantically large
book of prints on a massive pedestal. These prints by several artists from Texas and around the
world are rifts on Marcel Duchamp’s “Fountain.” People would gather around the book while
one person would volunteer to lift a page to see the next prints. I saw/acknowledged/chatted
with some of my UNT and UTD art professors and I ran into my publisher.
Both the Dallas Art Fair and Fountainhead show are over, but the Reading Room still has
Shane Mecklenburger’s work up until May 12th. He is selling “concepts” on Ebay and
mailing out certificates. Mecklenburger also used all the carbon in the Superman 3 script
to make a zirconium diamond, among two other items. He also houses his diamond in
shaped glass that relates to the item. His diamond, made of an armadillo, was of course,
incased in a glass armadillo. By the end of the night, my publisher and I went out for
pizza to
 il Cane Rosso in  Deep Ellum. I must have walked 20 miles that day in new shoes
no less, but all is good when you see so many wonderful things in one day.
Toni LaSelle, Study For Puritan, c. 1947–50; oil on canvas; 12 x 16 inches;
courtesy of Barry Whistler Gallery; photo by Allison V. Smith
Fountainhead, The Art Foundation -   Stephanie Madewell
Shane Mecklenburger - still from Perpetual Care.